Tuesday, 26 July 2016

Small London brewery Ordinary Mild Ale 1950 – 1953

Numbers. I look on them as friends. Much more reliable friends that people. You know where you are with numbers. A five doesn’t turn into a four behind your back. Though a six may turn out to be nine.

That’s my excuse for bothering you with a load more numbers. Not quite as many as in the last of this series. But enough to tide you through a sunny Tuesday morning. Unfortunately there are quite a few holes in the table. Because many come from the Truman rather than the Whitbread Gravity Book.

To be honest, there’s not much difference with the large brewery Milds. An average OG just over 1030º, about 3% ABV, around 75% attenuation. The only significant difference is the colour, which is a full 20 points lower. Oh, the price. That’s lower, too. About 0.75d.

On a personal not, I drank one of this set: Fuller’s Hock. I believe they still occasionally brew it. A shame it isn’t regularly available as it’s a very pleasant beer, when in good nick.

Wenlock Amber Ale is a bit odd. It’s one of the darkest beers in this set. How can that be amber by anyone’s reckoning?

Small London brewery Ordinary Mild Ale 1950 - 1953
Year Brewer Beer Price per pint d Acidity OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation colour
1950 Wenlock Ale 12 0.05 1030.6 1008.4 2.88 72.55% 100
1951 Wenlock X 12 1032.83 88
1953 Wenlock Amber Ale 14 0.05 1031.6 1006.5 3.26 79.43% 100
1950 Beasley Ale 12 1031.43 56
1953 Beasley X 13 1031.47 116
1953 Cannon X 13 1031.84 96
1951 Friary Mild Ale 14 0.06 1029.9 1004.5 3.30 84.95% 85
1950 Friary Holroyd X 12 1033.47 82
1951 Fullers Mild Ale 14 0.04 1031.2 1008.9 2.89 71.47% 90
1950 Hammerton Ale 12 1030.41 94
1950 Harman's X 12 1032.07 84
1950 Young & Co X 12 1033.07 68
1953 Young & Co X 13 1030.73 60
Average 12.7 0.05 1031.6 1007.1 3.08 77.10% 86.1
Sources:
Whitbread Gravity book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/02/002.
Truman Gravity Book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number B/THB/C/252


Either provincial Milds or London Best Mild next.

Monday, 25 July 2016

Random Dutch beers (part thirty seven)

It's Sunday morning 11:55. Time for the first beer of the day.

"You've seen bits of it? So you did see him picking bits of glass out of his feet."

"Yes."

"John . . . what's his second name? The character in the film."

"You should know, you've seen the whole film."

Lexie's talking to me about Die Hard. Not sure why. Defintely time for a beer. One from an old new brewery, De Leckere. They first started up in the 1990's, I believe. Then seemed to go away for a while. Not sure of the right story, and can't be arsed to look it up.


De Leckere Spring Haver 6.5% ABV
Lexie's gone back upstairs. Time to quickly write a quick Sketch. Pale yellow. Smells perfumy - elderflower, maybe? Maybe not. Perfummy and quite bitter in the mouth, with a lemon-like touch of acidity at the end.  Not bad. Quite like the fact that it's decently bitter, in a tobaccoey sort of way.

"Do you want to try my beer, Dolores?"

"In a minute."

"It's not a horrible one."

"That's OK. Quite nice."

Only a 25cl. bottle. It didn't last long. Time for beer number 2. One from De Naeckte Brouwers (the Naked Brewers) of Amstelveen. Which is where I work. It's the largest Dutch town without a train station. That's how exciting it is.


De Naeckte Brouwers Chinook SHIPA, 7.5% ABV
They've done a series of SHIPA each using a different hop. All the trendy ones, obviously. Not fun things like EKG. It's the colour of Bitter. Oddly savoury in the mouth. And not particularly bitter at all. How odd.

"Do you want to try my beer, Dolores?"

"I'm sitting down now."

"I'll bring it over."

"Ugh. It tastes strange."

"I know. I'm going to save some for Andrew."

Sunday, 24 July 2016

Summer sale still on - 20% off my Mega-Book series

apart from Bitter. I get some effing error when I try to update it. So it's still full price.

The other three in the series are 20% off. And I could be arsed with the linky image things today.

Please buy one. Or three. Lexie needs some new shoes. And kecks. Don't let him walk around raggety-arsed.

Support independent publishing: buy this book on Lulu. Support independent publishing: buy this book on Lulu.


http://www.lulu.com/shop/ronald-pattinson/strong/paperback/product-21861079.html
http://www.lulu.com/shop/ronald-pattinson/mild-plus/hardcover/product-22723500.html
http://www.lulu.com/shop/ronald-pattinson/porter/hardcover/product-21398311.html

Large London brewery Ordinary Mild Ale 1950 – 1954

You can probably guess from the highly specific title that I’m struggling with my sample size. It’s so large I’ve had to – somewhat arbitrarily – chop it into more manageable chunks.

The first and largest of which is the standard Mild from large London breweries. Of which there were still quite a few in the 1950’s. And all produced Mild. Or to be even more specific, Dark Mild Ale. Because there isn’t a pale one in the list. The lowest colour value is 50, which is a dark amber. Pretty well all the others are dark brown. The average is 106.7. Or quite dark.

The average OG has increased a little -  1.6 points – despite me having stripped out Best Mild to a separate table. So I’d reckon the real increase is more like 2 points. Combine that with a slightly lower average FG and it allows the ABV to tentatively poke its head above 3%. Hurray, you could now actually get drunk on Mild.

A few examples are still under 1030º. But in the case of Ind Coope this can be explained by the fact that they also brewed a stronger Mild. Which appears in a later table.

The price has increased a little, form 12.5d in the late 1940’s to 13.3d. That’s about 6p in modern money. It wouldn’t even get you a sip of Mild today. If you could find Mild, that is. There’s bugger all of it about nowadays.


Large London brewery Ordinary Mild Ale 1950 - 1954
Year Brewer Beer Price per pint d Acidity OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation colour
1950 Barclay Perkins Ale 13 0.05 1031.8 1006.8 3.24 78.62% 95
1950 Charrington MA 12 0.07 1029.6 1007.1 2.92 76.01% 120
1950 Courage MA 13 0.06 1032.4 1006.7 3.34 79.32% 120
1950 Ind Coope MA 12 0.07 1027.9 1008.9 2.46 68.10% 67
1950 Mann Crossman Mild Ale 13 0.07 1031.8 1005.8 3.38 81.76% 95
1950 Meux XX 12 0.08 1026.9 1005.6 2.76 79.18% 152
1950 Taylor Walker MA 12.5 0.07 1028.9 1006.1 2.96 78.89% 80
1950 Truman MA 13 0.07 1031.9 1008 3.10 74.92% 95
1950 Watney Best Ale 13 0.06 1031.2 1006.3 3.23 79.81% 105
1950 Whitbread Best Ale 13 1031.7 1010.5 2.80 66.88% 110
1951 Barclay Perkins Ale 14 0.05 1033.8 1007 3.48 79.29% 120
1951 Charrington  Ale 13 0.07 1033.5 1007.3 3.40 78.21% 110
1951 Courage Ale 13 0.06 1034.5 1010.3 3.13 70.14% 110
1951 Ind Coope Ale 12 0.05 1029.4 1008 2.77 72.79% 50
1951 Mann Crossman Ale 13 0.07 1034.5 1006.5 3.64 81.16% 90
1951 Meux X 12 1028.96 104
1951 Taylor Walker Ale 12 0.07 1031.7 1006.9 3.22 78.23% 100
1951 Truman Ale 13 0.07 1033.9 1006.3 3.59 81.42% 100
1951 Watney Ale 13 0.08 1032.7 1006 3.47 81.65% 110
1951 Watney Ale 14 0.08 1032.8 1007.4 3.30 77.44% 105
1951 Whitbread X 13 1031.3 96
1952 Barclay Perkins X 14 1031.51 118
1952 Charrington X 13 1032.61 118
1952 Ind Coope X 13 1031.1 82
1952 Mann Crossman X 14 1034.5 108
1952 Meux X 13 1029.96 152
1952 Taylor Walker X 13 1030.74 100
1952 Truman X 14 1033.7 110
1952 Watney X 14 1032.76 104
1952 Whitbread X 14 1031.39 114
1953 Barclay Perkins X 14 1032.11 96
1953 Charrington X 14 1032.67 128
1953 Courage X 14 1031.99 124
1953 Ind Coope X 14 1033.4 100
1953 Mann Crossman Best Ale 14 0.06 1032.9 1009.2 3.07 72.04% 110
1953 Meux X 13 1029.25 144
1953 Taylor Walker X 13 1032.74 96
1953 Truman Ale 14 0.05 1034 1008.1 3.36 76.18% 90
1953 Watney Ale 14 0.06 1033 1010.1 2.96 69.39% 95
1953 Whitbread Best Ale 14 0.05 1032.7 1010.5 2.87 67.89% 100
1954 Barclay Perkins XX 14 0.06 1029.4 1005.2 3.14 82.31% 110
1954 Charrington Ale 13 0.08 1030.7 1009.6 2.73 68.73% 120
1954 Courage Ale 14 0.05 1032.6 1006.2 3.43 80.98% 125
1954 Mann Crossman X 14 0.06 1032.9 1007.5 3.30 77.20% 115
1954 Meux Mild Ale 14 0.05 1031.2 1007.3 3.10 76.60% 120
1954 Taylor Walker T.W.X. 13 0.06 1031.7 1010.3 2.77 67.51% 100
1954 Truman LM 14 0.05 1034 1007.8 3.40 77.06% 95
1954 Watney XX 14 0.05 1032.3 1011.4 2.70 64.71% 110
1954 Whitbread Best Ale 14 0.06 1032.9 1009.9 2.98 69.91% 105
Average 13.3 0.06 1031.9 1007.8 3.12 75.45% 106.6
Sources:
Whitbread Gravity book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/02/002.
Truman Gravity Book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number B/THB/C/252
Whitbread brewing records

Saturday, 23 July 2016

Another tour

I'm starting to think of next year's schedule. In particular the spring.

I've only visited around half of the states in the US. I really need to cross off a few more. The Midwest seems the obvious place. I've only been to Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois. So plenty of new states ripe for plucking.

So if you're in that part of the world and would like to host a fat, old English (actually, probably Dutch by then) bloke, get in touch. I put on quite a show. No tap-dancing, but plenty of jokes and maybe an occasional song.

Obviously I'll be trying to shift copies of my book.







The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer
http://www.amazon.com/Home-Brewers-Guide-Vintage-Beer/dp/1592538827

Let's Brew - 1921 William Younger Btg DBS

As promised, here’s the longest-lived of William Younger’s Stouts, DBS.

Which I assume stands for Double Brown Stout. It was brewed from at least 1851 to 1949. Which a decent run for any beer. Despite what brewers may want you to believe, few beers live for centuries. A single century is rare enough.

How does it differ from MBS? It’s a little bit stronger, for one thing. And more heavily hopped. The grists are pretty similar: pale, black and amber malts, grits and caramel. Rather a lot of caramel, so it can’t be the 15,000 SRM kind. 500 SRM is a random-ish guess, purely based on getting the colour about right. They’re not that different. It makes you wonder why they bothered with both.

This is right in the middle of Younger’s grits period. Between 1913 and 1933 they used crazily large percentages of it in all their beers. Up to as much as 45% of the grist. Sometime later in the 1930’s the proportion of grits was greatly reduced. Just after the war they were using none at all, instead going for flaked barley as an adjunct.

This wasn’t voluntary. The use of maize products – which had to be imported – stopped during WW II. Brewers were told to use first flaked oats and later flaked barley instead. Restrictions continued in the immediate post-war years but by the early 1950’s maize, usually in the form of flakes, was once again a very common ingredient.


1921 William Younger Btg DBS
pale malt 6.50 lb 48.15%
black malt 0.50 lb 3.70%
amber malt 1.00 lb 7.41%
grits 5.00 lb 37.04%
caramel 500 SRM 0.50 lb 3.70%
Cluster 90 min 1.75 oz
Cluster 60 min 1.75 oz
Saaz 30 min 0.50 oz
Fuggles 30 min 1.50 oz
Goldings dry hops 1.00 oz
OG 1060
FG 1019
ABV 5.42
Apparent attenuation 68.33%
IBU 90
SRM 30
Mash at 156º F
Sparge at 160º F
Boil time 120 minutes
pitching temp 60º F
Yeast WLP028 Edinburgh Ale

Friday, 22 July 2016

Munich Helles vs. Dunkles in 1902 and 2014


As thromised, some more lovely numbers pertaining to Munich’s two most popular styles, Helles and Dunkles.

It’s going to be mostly numbers. The day is warm and my arse is lazy. Starting with a comparison of Dunkles and Helles in 1902:

Dunkles vs Helles in 1902
style Acidity OG Plato OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation Colour
Dunkles 0.18 13.52 1054.66 1019.14 4.55 65.01% 29.71
Helles 0.17 12.35 1049.68 1014.07 4.58 71.71% 9.21
difference -0.01 -1.18 -4.98 -5.07 0.03 6.70% -20.50

Despite having a gravity more than 1º Plato higher, Dunkles is on average a tiny bit weaker than Helles. And an awful lot darker. Nothing particularly unexpected there.

The pattern in 2014 is remarkably similar:

Dunkles vs Helles in 2014
style OG Plato OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation
Dunkles 12.58 1050.64 1010.88 5.18 78.53%
Helles 11.62 1046.62 1007.65 5.08 83.58%
difference -0.96 -4.02 -3.23 -0.10 5.05%


About a difference of 1º Plato in the OG, but a broadly similar ABV. That tells me that while the styles themselves may have changed, the relationship between the two has remained broadly similar.

Now let’s take a look at how Dunkles has changed over the years:

Dunkles 1902 vs 2014
style Acidity OG Plato OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation Colour
Dunkles 1902 0.18 13.52 1054.66 1019.14 4.55 65.01% 29.71
Dunkles 2014 12.58 1050.64 1010.88 5.18 78.53%
difference -0.95 -4.03 -8.26 0.63 13.52%


The gravity has dropped by 1º Plato, but the ABV has increased by more than 0.5%. Obviously due to a huge increase in the rate of attenuation.

Finally, how Helles has changed:

Helles 1902 vs 2014
style Acidity OG Plato OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation Colour
Helles 1902 0.17 12.35 1049.68 1014.07 4.58 71.71% 9.21
Helles 2014 11.62 1046.62 1007.65 5.08 83.58%
difference -0.73 -3.06 -6.42 0.50 11.87%

A slightly smaller drop in OG, but a similar increase in ABV.

That’s enough tables for now.

Thursday, 21 July 2016

Provincial Mild Ale 1946 – 1949

More Mild Ale numbers. And some unexpected ones at that.

I’m so glad that I split the London and provincial Milds. Because the two sets are surprisingly dissimilar. Something I hadn’t spotted previously.

First a word about where the breweries were located. Six were from Birmingham: Ansell, Atkinson, Dare, Davenport, Frederick Smith and Mitchell & Butler. Two from Exeter: City Brewery and St. Annes. Two from Norwich: Morgans and Steward and Patteson. Two from Portsmouth: Brickwood and Portsmouth United. And finally Burtonwood of Warrington.

The Birmingham Milds all have relatively high gravities. Coupled my decent attenuation, it means they’re mostly over 3.5% ABV. Which is very high for the period. If you remember, most of the London Milds were under 3% ABV. I’m not surprised that the Norwich Milds have some of the lowest gravities. Beers from rural areas tended to be weaker, for some reason.

Most interesting of all is the colour. Or rather lack of it. Because there’s only one of this set – Burtonwood – that’s properly dark.  Three examples – City, Brickwood, Portsmouth United and St. Annes are pale. That is, all the ones from Exeter and Portsmouth. The Birmingham beers are all semi-dark, as are those from Norwich.

The real fun comes when you compare the colours of the London and provincial Milds. Only one London example was pale and one semi-dark. All the rest were properly dark. Here’s a comparison of the London and provincial analyses:

London vs. provincial Mild Ale 1946 - 1949
region Price per pint d Acidity OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation colour
London 12.5 0.06 1030.3 1008.6 2.82 71.69% 101.4
Provinces 13.1 0.07 1032.2 1005.2 3.51 83.94% 43.81

Provincial beers were a halfpenny a pint dearer, slightly higher in gravity, considerably higher in ABV and much paler in colour than their London counterparts. The difference is much greater than I would have imagined. Given the higher FG and lower attenuation, my guess is that London Milds were sweeter.

Provincial Mild Ale 1946 - 1949
Year Brewer Beer Price per pint d Acidity OG FG ABV App. Atten-uation colour
1946 Lees K 1028.0
1946 Lees Bot. B 1030.0
1946 Lees BM 1033.0
1948 Lees K 1028.0
1948 Lees BM 1032.0
1948 Lees Bot. B 1030.0
1949 Ansell Mild Ale 13 0.05 1035.4 1007.4 3.64 79.10% 50
1949 Atkinsons Mild Ale 13 0.07 1034.6 1004.8 3.88 86.13% 50
1949 Brickwoods Mild Ale 13 0.06 1033.2 1004.8 3.70 85.54% 20.5
1949 Burtonwood Mild Ale 13 0.06 1027.5 1003.5 3.12 87.27% 80
1949 City Brewery Mild Ale 13 0.06 1032.6 1006.8 3.35 79.14% 21
1949 Dare Mild Ale 13 0.08 1034.6 1006.9 3.60 80.06% 58
1949 Davenport Mild Ale 13 0.07 1032 1007.9 3.12 75.31% 58
1949 Frederick Smith Mild Ale 13 0.06 1035 1008.6 3.42 75.43% 58
1949 Mitchell & Butler XX 18 0.05 1034.6 1003.9 4.00 88.73% 35
1949 Morgans Mild Ale 11 0.08 1027.7 1002.8 3.24 89.89% 50
1949 Portsmouth United Mild Ale 13 0.08 1029.3 1003.1 3.41 89.42% 19
1949 St. Annes Brewery Mild Ale 13 0.06 1034.9 1003 4.16 91.40% 20
1949 Steward & Patteson Mild Ale 11 0.10 1027.7 1004.5 3.01 83.75% 50
Average 13.08 0.07 1032.2 1005.2 3.51 83.94% 43.8
Sources:
Lees brewing records held at the brewery.
Whitbread Gravity book held at the London Metropolitan Archives, document number LMA/4453/D/02/002.

Next we’ll be moving on to the 1950’s.